Api market bitcoin

A new suite of powerful, flexible, and accurate cryptocurrency market data endpoints. From demanding enterprise use cases to economical pricing plans for startups, there is a plan for you. Created by the most trusted cryptocurrency market data provider in the industry. Your private key for all crypto use cases. The CoinGecko data market APIs are a set of robust APIs that developers can use to not only enhance their existing apps and services but also to build advanced crypto market apps. The team is also responsive to feedback and the occasions that we did these were quickly implemented into their api . Market capitalization (often shortened to market cap) is the approximate total value of a cryptocurrency, typically shown in US dollars. The market cap of a cryptocurrency is calculated by multiplying the number of coins or tokens in existence by its current price.

Api market bitcoin

What is Crypto API Trading? A Beginner's Guide to Bitcoin APIs - Bitcoin Market Journal

Clay Collins: So it's just about talking with the customers all the time and I'm on the phone multiple times per week with institutional traders, developers and trying to learn everything I can about making a solid product.

I think kind of the DNA you have to have to make this kind of product is very different from the average product in this space. There's a lot of hackathon developers. There's a lot of kind of young dudes in their 20s spitting stuff up over the weekend. And to create a data product and a data platform I think it requires a certain level of discipline.

So every single line of code has a unit test that covers that code. Brian Krogsgard: Which means, for non-programmers, that means that what he says is going to happen has been tested via a whole nother slate of programming tools to verify that that's what happens, because he said it was going to happen. I don't know if that described that well.

Clay Collins: Yeah, we have just as much code testing the app, as the app itself. Which means that myself as a non-developer, my CTO or someone else on the team will often send me a version of the app and I'll log into GitHub and deploy to production without anyone manually testing it.

So it's just a certain level of rigor. It's not something that most people have the stomach for because it's slower at first, but it pays off in spades down the road. Brian Krogsgard: Let's take a break, say thank you to our partner for this episode, Delta. Go ledgerstatus. This is the best way to track your portfolio in crypto, bar none, guaranteed. And you know they've got some great new features. The last two releases have just been chock full of stuff.

Live order books and depth charts, number one on the request list for people that I've talked to who said that they like Delta but they want more. That's the biggest thing they've wanted. You've got that now. Brian Krogsgard: I think they support like a dozen exchanges so that you can see the actual order book, the depth charts, recent trades, all that stuff, right there in the app.

It's really great. They've just released portfolio analytics as well and I've thought this was really cool because I can go back and it'll actually tell me, if I'm a pro user it tells me even more, but it tells me stuff like what exchange are my coins on or what wallet is it in and it gives me these really nice graphs with all of that information, with a lot of analytical data.

It also even tells me what's a good trade or a bad trade. So if I sold something and it's gone down since then it'll tell me hey that was a good sell because it's gone down since then.

Brian Krogsgard: It gives you some insights on your past decision making to let you know if you've done a good thing or a bad thing with that trade.

Just give you a little more information about your trading and so that you can learn more to be a better trader. Brian Krogsgard: Delta's really awesome. They're always working on cool stuff. Somebody may be listening to this and they might just say okay, so you want to provide data for hedge funds or for traders or people that want to build something like nomics.

You have to be dreaming up more that this will be, in terms of the entire market, beyond a whole bunch of weird crypto assets that most should die.

Other than Bitcoin, Ethereum, and some large caps, do we really need this data? What else do you imagine in terms of being able to fit into your ecosystem?

You have a grand vision of the future it seems. Clay Collins: Yeah, totally, totally. There's a couple of functions that we want to serve. One is want to be like the internet archive of the new financial system. So archiving all of these dead coins, all of these markets that have expired, we want to tell the story and the history of what was happening when all of this started to come onto the scene. I think a second thing is that Perhaps this is overkill for what we have right now, but what we're intending to build is the data backbone for the new financial world, for the open financial system.

Clay Collins: And we take that very seriously. Also, the think right now there's not a lot of data. Perhaps there is. We've indexed billions of trades. And multiple versions of local bitcoins that are reporting their data. Then OTC desks. And then add to that security token exchanges. Clay Collins: So imagine someday every single local coffee shop, pizza shop, anyone who wants to fundraise in this way, every single building in your city has a token and that token is perhaps traded on some kind of local exchange, there's just going to be an explosion of exchanges.

And then add to that order book data. So data for orders that haven't been filled or have been canceled or maybe the order's been placed and that order converts to an actual trade and then add to that blockchain data and you have a huge undertaking in terms of-. Brian Krogsgard: And that's all underlying physical product. That's the asset itself. That doesn't even get into a future where there's derivative products or futures or options. There's a whole nother set of trades and orders and everything.

So y'all want to support all of that someday right? Clay Collins: Oh, no, and we are. And we have specs to handle that right now. So if you're from a blockchain project, if you're from an exchange, if you're from an OTC desk and you want to integrate your data with us, let us know. We have specs for you to write to. If you can stand up three endpoints, pretty simple endpoints, we can give you a heck of a lot of exposure.

So yeah, we're doing all of that and then add to that different indexes. So each of those bots are going to have their own rankings. There's quite a future. Brian Krogsgard: This seems like an exponential explosion of data that's going to be on your ecosystem. How are you looking to be able to scale that? Like is this built on just a regular old database? I mean what's this look like?

Clay Collins: So kind of the latest is using Kafka and Cassandra and that's what we're building on. We're not using Microsoft Access. Clay Collins: Kind of these large nonrelationable wide column store databases that can handle trillions upon trillions of data points. That's how you got to do it. Brian Krogsgard: And then I don't want to get too much in the weeds. There's no rate limiting. So we cache the hell out of our endpoints. So you can hit us as hard as you want.

We don't care. Go nuts. A lot of people charge quite a bit for these sort of uncapped non rate limited APIs, but yeah we won't rate limit. That's another thing that no one else will do that we do is we don't rate limit. Brian Krogsgard: And you're just assuming either that it's worth eating the cost for now or the cost is somewhat nominal for now.

Do you expect your pay customers will be able to absorb that function for the long haul? Clay Collins: So a couple things, one, we're really good at caching. Second, we just want to win in the short term. So we want people to feel comfortable using us and third, I'm funding this myself.

In the long term, the way we're modeled the big cost is not that we're not rate limiting it here, it's engineers. Brian Krogsgard: Right.

We probably could have led with this but I think people have probably gotten the picture by now, but this is a centralized business with a open API and there's no token. There's none of that stuff. You're not a crypto project. Unless someday maybe you tokenize nomics. But this is a normal old business, not like a blockchain project itself. It's not token based or anything like that. Clay Collins: Right. Yeah, so we're using centralized databases.

We're a centralized company. I'm a big believer in that not everything needs to be decentralized or run on a blockchain and I actually think that what we're doing is kind of a horrible candidate for the blockchain. It's a terrible blockchain use case. You want millisecond response times on APIs. Yeah, you probably don't want to use a blockchain. So yeah, at some point maybe we'll tokenize equity of the company and let people buy a piece of what we're doing.

But for now this is kind of We want to be really good at the boring basics. And that's what we're focused on. Brian Krogsgard: In addition to all of this you're doing a podcast called Flippening.

I just listened to a three part series that y'all put out about security tokens and probably tripled my knowledge of not only I kind of had an idea of what security tokens potential was, but more about who are the players within the security token landscape and what do they envision and how do they differ from each other.

So people might hear of Polymath because it has a token, but people should also be aware of something like Harbor and they provide a different type of service than what poly does. Bruce Fenton was on your show, who's a big Ravencoin guy. Brian Krogsgard: And they're going to have stuff on top of a platform on Ravencoin, but he created a security token for his company on Counterparty through bitcoin.

There's already all these tools for security tokens, so you just did this huge deep dive, why are you spending I thought about how much time Clay must have spent making this podcast, because each episode's got half a dozen guests, edited down into the questions. How much time are you spending on this stuff and why? What's your basis for doing such an in depth series like that? Clay Collins: All in, that was at least hours. I'm embarrassed how much time that series took. Yeah, so that was just one of these stupid ideas where I was like I want to do an audio documentary.

I had heard a really good audio documentary about cryptocurrencies and there was a part of me as a product person that respects the craftsmanship that said to myself I want to create something that is like planet money level content for the cryptocurrency space about security tokens. Clay Collins: And kind of the genesis of that was I interviewed one company. I interviewed Polymath about security tokens and I got just this fraction of a picture of what was happening and then I realized there's exchanges, and there are issuers, and there were just so many regulatory bodies and there was so many different components to this.

Because there's already a pretty mature financial system that deals with securities already, so I couldn't do just one interview. So I started booking all these interviews and then I realized that it was too late. Once I interviewed the people now I had a commitment to publish them, but it didn't make sense to publish all these interviews by themselves because they really didn't stand on their own.

I needed to weave a narrative through it and then I need to write a narrative, which means I need-. Clay Collins: -storyboard out the whole thing. It was really a pain in the ass, but the interesting thing is, after I finished that, I figured out what my workflow was for creating these, and I've realized I kind of figured out how I could do one in a third of the time next time, so I'm probably going to be doing another stupid one here in the future.

Brian Krogsgard: So, is the purpose behind these that you just want to share what you're learning and traditional podcast stuff? Or is this marketing for Nomics? Clay Collins: Yeah, it's marketing for Nomics. It's really the only podcast for institutional crypto-investors. There's no podcast that has more listenership and more coverage from the institutional crowd than Flippening. That's exactly who our target audience is.

Everyone who's paid for the API so far has [inaudible ] the podcast. Clay Collins: Because I don't have a big content marketing team, we can't churn out a bunch of thought pieces or tutorials. There's just me. If I can do one thing that's going to attract the kind of audience that I want to get, what can I do? It was create this podcast because I started evaluating how much time does CoinDesk spend to put on Consensus or Consensus Invest?

And it's millions of dollars. I've thrown big events before. Clay Collins: Yeah, and they make millions of dollars too. But having come from the event business, I bet they're just doing better than break even. That's my prediction. I could be completely wrong, but I bet they're just doing better, even with how it's monetized. I bet you they're just doing a little bit better than break even. In New York, in Times Square, that's my prediction.

Brian Krogsgard: Yeah, I've run small events, and it's enormous energy and very little money is what it ends up as most of the time. Yeah, so I was doing the stats on my podcast, and every single episode was getting about 50, downloads. I was like, "There was 12, people at Consensus Invest," so I bet I'm getting just as much coverage with that podcast from this very niche institutional investor crowd.

The ROI for me really made sense. Even though it's a pain in the ass that I love to do, I'm probably going to still continue doing it. Brian Krogsgard: Who do you consider an institutional investor in the space? What's an institutional investor to you? Clay Collins: Yeah, so I define institutional as someone who raises money from other parties to invest it on their behalf.

Clay Collins: Usually they've filed as a sort of a Reg D fund or they're usually regulated in some way, so they're not just playing with their own money. A family office is technically not an institutional investor, but some of these family offices have billions under management, so it's kind of like they walk like a duck, they talk like a duck, and they have that level of rigor to what they do.

They've got an entire staff and stuff. Yeah, institutional investors are-. Brian Krogsgard: What are some of the big lessons that you've learned, based on the people you've talked to, in terms of what's most concerning to an institutional investor? And let's level that up, the higher-end ones. For instance, I know custody is an issue for real institutional investors, whereas, for a lot of people with a little less on the line, they can kind of manage custody in-house.

But if you're a regulated entity, custody becomes significantly more important. What kind of lessons for those types of people do you think you've been able to come up with? Clay Collins: Yeah, so custody is definitely the big one. That's where good OTC desks come in. You place a phone call, you arrange the price ahead of time, and then you do the trade. OTC desks and clearinghouses are probably the next point of concern.

Clay Collins: And then it's just good projects. I mean, it's hard for a lot of these folks to find coins other than Bitcoin and Ethereum that have enough liquidity and market depth for them to feel comfortable and just history. Brian Krogsgard: Do you think people that come from traditional markets are having a hard time grasping the mix of speculation versus fundamental value in projects?

Because I think one of the things I'm seeing is a lot of stuff is way down to where, if this was a traditional market where the market is fairly efficient and understanding what pricing is and what works, they'd look like deals, right?

I've gone through this lesson myself as a trader because stuff just doesn't-. Do you think it's a learning curve for people trying to learn how to invest in crypto versus investing in the real world, if you will?

That's a good question. I think everyone's focused on the fact that these things are tokens and kind of forgetting about the real world analogy. A lot of these hedge funds really aren't doing forex trades, but in a lot of ways, that's what Bitcoin coin is. It's a forex thing. There's no underlying value. You're placing a bet on the network and the utility value of the coin, so it's really hard to evaluate what it is because it's not like a security where there's this underlying asset, and then you can try and figure out what that underlying asset is worth.

Clay Collins: And then with things like Filecoin and crypto commodities, that just looks a lot like VC. You're buying something based on the future value of that. But the hard thing there with crypto commodities like Filecoin is it doesn't matter how much utility value exists. There's a lot of hard drive space in the world, so just because it's tokenized doesn't mean that all the sudden this thing is worth more.

Clay Collins: I think folks in general need to not focus as much on the fact that it's a token and the whole thing is some new asset class. I don't think of this as a new asset class. I think what's happening is tokenized versions of the analogous thing that exists in the real world, and there's so many different versions of that.

There's tokenized securities that represent equity in a company. There's this new financial system. There's true cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin. There's Ethereum, which is this I couldn't even tell you. Brian Krogsgard: I was about to ask, how would you give an analogy for a protocol or a network with a value? Because in the web or whatever, open-source software, historically we don't really assign monetary value directly to the platform, a protocol, an API, whatever.

But that's what we're doing in crypto. Brian Krogsgard: That one, I agree with you completely, even though I've always said this is a whole new asset class. I agree with you that, at the base layer, it's a business represented by a token or whatever else, except for this protocol side of things. It's weird for me, and I guess maybe that's why the market's inefficient and why we're seeing these drastic swings is because we're trying to figure out what is something like the 0x protocol worth?

And we have this ability to put a monetary value on them. I mean, I think a lot of times a monetary value is just that the greater fool is going to come on and buy it for more, and that is the [inaudible ] of the token.

Brian Krogsgard: Musical chairs is not a game I want to play, but I agree, it does seem like we're all playing it. We're just hoping that some other sucker is going to be the one left without a chair. I go to Vegas every once in a while. Why don't you know what you're doing? I think there's something real about Bitcoin.

I think there's something real about Ethereum. I think something that is not discussed enough with regards to Ethereum is the fact that there's these compound or kind of second-order network effects that occur. Everyone talks about the network effects of Bitcoin. It's like Visa: the more people that accept Visa, the more valuable Visa is. Same with phones. Owning a phone makes owning a phone more valuable to everyone, every time one is purchased.

Or Facebook. I think people generally get network effects. Clay Collins: There's another effect at play: the Lindy effect, which is just the value of something that doesn't break increases with every unit of time that it continues to not break.

We develop more trust in the system. That's the Lindy effect. Clay Collins: But I think second order network effects occur with platforms like Ethereum, where Ether itself has network effects, but then built on top of Ethereum are these additional tokens that themselves have network effects.

I really think there's something to that. There's just so much developer activity on top of Ethereum. The transaction volume is there. The combined long-tail of the network effects of the tokens built on Ethereum is just truly outstanding, where none of them individually on their own maybe have world-changing network effects just yet.

But the cumulative power makes Ethereum extremely defensible. Clay Collins: I'm not a philosopher or an economist, and I don't spend all my time writing up Medium posts about this, but there's something really, really powerful about what's happening with Ethereum.

I don't know if necessarily all that accrues to the token or how this all plays out, but I think there's something special happening. Brian Krogsgard: So, network effects, to me, make sense. I come from open-source software, so I understand the power of "Hey, other people use this, so I'm going to use this. Other people use this.

I'm going to use this. I can find developers who build on this," etc. It's a known thing. I get it, and I understand it, and it makes sense. To me, it's kind of analogous to JavaScript, right? JavaScript kind of is at the base of web programming, and then you have all these frameworks built on top of it, like Angular and React and Aurelia.

Clay Collins: A bajillion of these typescripts, what have you. Each of these, like React in particular has a lot of network effects going for it. But those network effects only reinforce JavaScript, right? Brian Krogsgard: The parallel could be let's say 0x.

I apologize for shilling. I don't know any ZRX right now. But let's say 0x becomes the way to create a decentralized exchange, just because their protocol's that good. Now all decentralized exchanges are essentially using 0x, which is built on Ethereum. Or CryptoKitties, like gaming becomes very popular through CryptoKitties or some other thing. Because of that, it's reinforcing the underlying network, so they're self-strengthening.

The more stuff that gets built on Ethereum, the more likely Ethereum creates that stronghold, even if, like everybody believes, it's garbage. It doesn't necessarily matter, as long as that's what people keep building on, and the developer ecosystem builds around. There are plenty of people that would say JavaScript is garbage, but it is number one.

Clay Collins: Exactly. Or I hear this all the time, people talk about WordPress. It's got this markdown. It's so much faster. WordPress is crap. Nobody cares. Brian Krogsgard: Nobody cares because you can go to any But you can go to any ad agency, any interactive agency in the world pretty much, and you say, "My website's on WordPress," and they'll just say, "Okay, well, we can build on that. It's straightforward, and people have experience building on it, so it doesn't matter how good your fancy content management system is because everyone in the world has a knowledge and an understanding of WordPress, and they can build on WordPress.

You can use this API to include markets data in your websites, mobile apps or desktop applets. Please remember to add a link to Bitcoincharts! You can use this to price goods and services in Bitcoins. This will yield much lower fluctuations than using a single market's latest price.

Weighted prices are calculated for the last 24 hours, 7 days and 30 days. If there are no trades during an interval like no trade within 24 hours no value will be returned. Prepare your code to handle this cases! The returned JSON is dictionary with elements for each currency. A simple average does not favor a regional exchange with high volume and ensures that the XBP is meaningful for the largest number of market participants.

Also, a simple average approach minimizes the impact of volume irregularities and accidentally excluding an exchange. As overall liquidity improves and the number of global exchange choices increases, the impact of regional variances should diminish and a volume-weighted approach may become more appropriate. Bitcoin price index data and the API has been used by many projects, tools, and journalists.

Non-USD currency data converted using hourly conversion rate from openexchangerates. We also offer the BPI converted into in any of our supported currencies. By default, this will return the previous 31 days' worth of data. This endpoint accepts the following optional parameters:.

What is Crypto API Trading? A Beginner’s Guide to Bitcoin APIs API Overview

24crypto.de Exchange APIs Websockets Leverage the Websocket API to receive market data and to interact with the trading system in real time. Every message comes in JSON format and trading messages use the FIX standard for naming fields, and message types. Our Cryptocurrency and Bitcoin API is a lightning fast REST API that aspires to be the data backbone for developers and professional cryptoinvestors. CoinDesk provides a simple API to make its Bitcoin Price Index (BPI) data programmatically available to others. You are free to use this API to include our data in any application or website as you. Tags:Btc bitfinex tradingview, Es seguro bitcoin trader, Bitcoin trader foro, Interactive brokers short bitcoin futures, Ocn btc tradingview

3 thoughts on “Api market bitcoin

  • 05.02.2020 at 08:25
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    Excuse, that I interrupt you, but it is necessary for me little bit more information.

    Reply

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